In this section, I am going to get the G540 and 48v power supply mounted.

I will then install my terminal blocks and converters.

Finally a little wiring to tie it all together.

The MASSO will run on anything from 9VDC to 26VDC.  I chose 12VDCso I could also power PC fans and other devices.

 

Mounting the G540

I start by mounting my G540. I am using a couple of my short DIN rail brackets and some angle brackets to secure it to my DIN rail.

Notice that the G540 is mounted upside down.  This is so I will have access to the screw terminals.

For more information on my mounting brackets, please visit my:

DIN Rail Mounting Brackets page

 

Mounting the Power Supply

To mount the  48v power,  I attach two of my short DIN rail brackets to the 3mm mounting holes provided on the power supply.

Notice that the output connectors are located on the left and the AC inputs are located on the right.

 

Mounting Top DIN Rail

I did some early testing and decided I did not have enough room on the main board for the VFD I will be testing later.

To save space, I decided to mount my terminal blocks on the top of the power supply.

To accommodate this, I mounted a piece of 12" DIN rail to the top of the power supply.

I used some 3mm screws with washers to secure the rail.

 

Mounting Terminal Blocks

I need 3 power sources for this build. 48V to power the G540 and motors, 12V to power the MASSO, and 5V to power a relay board.

Ground Terminals

I start by mounting 5 black terminal blocks to the top DIN rail. I then attach an external bridge. 

 

48V Terminals

I do the same thing with 4 red terminal blocks.  Notice the grey terminal block that I am using as a spacer between the red and the black.

12V Terminals

I use blue terminal blocks for my 12V power source.

 

5V Terminals

I use blue terminal blocks for my 5V power source.

I add end stops to both ends of the terminal blocks.

For more information on DIN rail terminal blocks, please check out my:

DIN Rail Terminal Blocks page

 

Adding AC Power

For my AC power, I will be using a heavy duty barrier strip.  It is attach to the DIN rails just behind the power supply with two short mounting brackets.

I attach a three prong 110V power cord to the bottom three terminals.

  • Greed:GND
  • White:Nutral
  • Black:Line

As an option, I added a power switch by cutting the black lead and attaching a power switch.

Power Switch

    On the back three terminals, I connect the power supply AC terminals using the same leads.

    • Greed:GND
    • White:Nutral
    • Black:Line

    Important

    While you can use the power switch to remove power from the whole board, I recommend pulling the plug when working on any wiring on the board.

     

    Power the G540

    To power the G540, I run a black wire between one of the V- terminals on the power supply to pin 12 on the G540 terminal block. I then run a second black wire from another V- terminal on the power supply to my DIN rail ground terminals.

    I run a red wire to one of the V+ terminals on the power supply to pin 11 on the G540 terminal block. I then run a second red wire from another V+ terminal on the power supply to my DIN rail 48V terminals.

    At this point if you power up the board, your power supply should start up, and the G540 should have a red fault.

     

    12v Power

    To power my 12V terminal blocks, I used a 10A, 48V to 12V buck converter.

    I wire:

    • Both Black Wires = Ground Terminal Blocks
    • Red Wire = 48V Terminal Blocks
    • Yellow Wire = 12V Terminal Blocks

    Power up the system and use a volt meter to check the voltage between the ground terminal blocks and the 12V terminal blocks. It should be 12V within +- .5v.

     

    5V Power

    I attach a small 3-40V buck converter to the top DIN rail suing a mounting bracket as shown here.

    The input negative (-) lead on the buck converter is wired to the ground terminal blocks.

    The input positive (+) lead on the buck converter is wired to the 12V terminal blocks.

    The output positive (+) lead on the buck converter is wired to the 5V terminal blocks.

    At this point you need to power up the system and while using a volt meter between the ground terminals and the 5V terminals adjust the small trimmer on the buck converter until the meter reads 5V.  As an option see voltage monitors below.

     

    Voltage Monitor

    As an option, I added a couple inexpensive voltage monitors to my 12 and 5 volt terminal blocks.

    The black lead on each monitor is connected to the ground terminal blocks.

    The red and white leads on the first monitor are twisted together and wired to the 12V terminal blocks.

    The red and white leads on the second monitor are twisted together and wired to the 5V terminal blocks.

    At this point you can use the trimmer on the buck converter to adjust until the monitor reads 5V.